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Training

Training times 
 
Tuesday lesson - Junior students (aged 7 to 13) - 6.00 till 7.00pm - $4 per lesson (payable at the start of each term) at Whangaparaoa School Hall

Tuesday lesson - Senior students (13+) and Adults -   7.10 till 8.25pm - $4 per lesson (payable at the start of each term) at Whangaparaoa School Hall
 
Thursday   lesson - Junior students (aged 7 to 13) - 6.00 till 7.00pm - $4 per lesson (payable at the start of each term) at Whangaparaoa School Hall

Thursday lesson - Senior students (13+) and Adults - 7.10 till 8.25pm - $4 per lesson (payable at the start of each term) at Whangaparaoa School Hall.

Our Aims through training 
While there have been countless films made depicting martial arts, and reams of material produced to literally describe it, little has been made of the essence of what the Karate practitioner actually gleans from Karate-do training. To the layman, karate is a catchall phrase for "fighting," when in actuality, the verb has limited association with how the Karate-ka (practitioner) regards it.

The true way of Karate training requires inner balance, compassion and clarity in all situations. While great physical prowess is developed and expanded, so too is spiritual fortitude, mental focus and a gentle compassionate character. Karate-do means that we are diligent in our quest for optimum performance balance and positive attitude whether in dojo practice, in our school work, business, family, or community at large. Therefore, the karate-ka is expected to demonstrate his/her spiritual, mental and physical strength in the most honorable and productive ways possible, and in every arena possible. Furthermore, he/she is expected to be the advocate of honorable principles whenever the opportunity presents itself. In other words, Karate-do is much more than self-defense, it is a way of requiring a conscientious, honorable approach in every detail of our lives.

The essence and test of a true karate champion in the sport of Karate, requires the ideals of sportsmanship and citizenship at the highest levels. Win or lose, the Karate-ka walks with a confidence that is spirited but not over inflated; they regard their opponent with respect not overestimating or underestimating the others ability; they never neglect the protocol required nor take the respect given, for granted.

Karate-do skills are not developed through mindless practice but demand the cultivation of our virtuous selves as well as the strengths to define, as well as defend the highest principles of humankind.

"Responsibility"

It is common in these days of heroes to think of karate in terms of physical prowess, of the ability to devastate masses of humanity with flailing punches and kicks like some vengeful, whirling dervish. People often forget, or possibly never learn, that there is a side to the Martial Arts that is infinitely deeper than technique and that is spirit.

The true study of Karate begins at the black belt level and is a gradual realization of that spirit. With the belt, for instance, comes not only the privilege of a certain amount of rank, but also a recognition of another more important facet: responsibility.

If we accept the privilege of wearing the black belt then we must also accept the responsibility that goes along with it: responsibility to the school; the teacher; the students; and the Art.

If we are to be leaders--and that is what we become when we accept the promotion--then we must act like leaders. We must find the "WAY" referred to in the suffix "DO" of Karate-Do, live it and pass it on to those who follow us.

As a simple example, look at the position of a senior student. It is actually their roll in the hierarchy to pass on the etiquette and philosophies of the school and the system to incoming students. Instead of beating them to a pulp, show them the correct way to behave and begin to cultivate and nurture the roots of the Martial Arts philosophies.

People who attain the black belt level often think of it in the political sense of power and prestige. The award somehow, makes them something more than what they really are. It is nothing more than an arbitrary land mark and what it becomes is what we make of it. It should be an indication of spirit; of kindness, warmth, and inner strength; of wisdom and responsibility.